Effect of Aluminum Chloride Hemostatic Agent Contamination on Shear Bond Strength of Glass-ionomer Cements to Dentin

Sumana Jittidecharaks, Nattapong Nunto, Yuttana Khuwuttayakorn

Abstract


The purpose of this study was to compare the shear strength of the bonds between glass-ionomer cements and dentin contaminated with a hemostatic agent containing aluminum chloride, and uncontaminated.  Human third molars were sectioned mesiodistally and ground to obtain flat dentin surfaces.  One hundred and twenty dentin specimens were randomly divided into two main groups of 60 specimens each: Group 1 (control group) was uncontaminated; Group 2 was contaminated for two minutes with 25% aluminum chloride hemostatic agent.  The specimens in both groups were rinsed with distilled water and air-dried. Subgroups were formed according to the four glass-ionomer cements used in the study (KetacTMFil Plus, KetacTM Molar Aplicap, VitremerTM and KetacTM N100).  Dentin surfaces were restored with glass-ionomer cement (diameter 3 mm.).  All specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 oC for 24 hours before the shear bond strength was evaluated in a universal testing machine.  The types of failure were also assessed using a stereomicroscope with 100X magnification. The data was statistically analyzed by two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey’s multiple comparison test and the average shear bond strength values were compared by the Independent Sample t-test at a 95% confident level (p<0.05). The interfaces between dentin and glass-ionomer cement were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy operated at 3000X magnification.  The shear strength of bonds betweenKetacTMFil Plus and contaminated dentin was significantly higher (5.31±1.45 MPa), and the shear strength of bonds between KetacTM N100 and contaminated dentin was lower (2.80±1.80 MPa) than those of bonds to uncontaminated dentin.  The shear strength of bonds between KetacTM Molar Aplicap and VitremerTM and contaminated dentin were not significantly different from those of bonds to uncontaminated dentin. At glass-ionomer cement-dentin interface, different ion-enriched layers were presented by different glass-ionomer cements.In conclusion, the shear strength of bonds between glass-ionomer cements and dentin contaminated with a hemostatic agent containing aluminum chloride might depend on the surface preparations and compositions of glass-ionomer cements.

 

Keywords:  Glass-ionomer cement, Shear bond strength, Hemostatic agent